Open-Source Alternatives to Proprietary Enterprise Software

Posted February 27, 2012 | View revision history

I’ve said in the past, that open-source’s lack of adoption in the enterprise space is due, at least in part, to the lack of “focus-group tested ammunition”. Today, I hope the community can help even the odds with this collaboratively edited list of open-source alternatives to typical government and enterprise software needs

I was thrilled to come across this comprehensive list of open-source options for government last week, part of the UK’s Open Source Procurement Toolkit, but was disappointed to see, in addition to it being published in most government agencies favorite web publishing format (PDF), it hadn’t been updated in more than a year.

With a little find-and-replace magic, I converted the PDF into a stand-alone web page (based on Twitter’s open-source Bootstrap and Jekyll), cleaned up a few typos, and published it to GitHub in hopes that it can be collaboratively edited by the broader open-source community.

Please browse the list, and if you find any additions, corrections, or improvements, fork the page on GitHub and submit a pull request.

Live Site: Open-Source Alternatives to Proprietary Enterprise Software

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benbalter

Ben Balter is Chief of Staff for Security at GitHub, the world’s largest software development platform. Previously, as a Staff Technical Program manager for Enterprise and Compliance, Ben managed GitHub’s on-premises and SaaS enterprise offerings, and as the Senior Product Manager overseeing the platform’s Trust and Safety efforts, Ben shipped more than 500 features in support of community management, privacy, compliance, content moderation, product security, platform health, and open source workflows to ensure the GitHub community and platform remained safe, secure, and welcoming for all software developers. Before joining GitHub’s Product team, Ben served as GitHub’s Government Evangelist, leading the efforts to encourage more than 2,000 government organizations across 75 countries to adopt open source philosophies for code, data, and policy development. More about the author →

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