How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Code

I am gave a brief lightning talk at April’s WordPress DC Meetup on the basics of HTML and PHP (“coding for dummies”). The goal: learn how to avoid breaking your website if you edit it. Below are the slides.

The Cliff’s Notes are

  • The process

    • The server executes PHP and outputs HTML, CSS, JavaScript, etc.Screenshot of the presentation showing the relationship between server, browser, and user
    • The user’s browser takes that output and renders a visual representation of the page
  • Client-side Languages

    • HTML – Static (unchanging) content; provides structure
    • CSS – Provides style and form
    • JavaScript – Provides interactivity
  • PHP – Wrapped with “php” and “?>

    • Variable - Text, a number, true/false, or a group of variable; identified by “$
    • If Statement – performs an action if a statement is true
    • While Loop – performs an action while a statement is true
    • For / Foreach – combines elements of while and if
    • Functions – predefined set of actions; always followed by “( )
    • Don’t forget semicolons

Thanks to all who came out or tuned into the live stream. Comments? Questions? I’d love to hear your thoughts below or feel free to contact me.

benbalter

Prior to GitHub, Ben was a member of the inaugural class of Presidential Innovation Fellows where he served as entrepreneur in residence reimagining the role of technology in brokering the relationship between citizens and government. Ben has also served as a Fellow in the Office of the US Chief Information Officer within the Executive Office of the President where he was instrumental in drafting the President’s Digital Strategy and Open Data Policy, on the SoftWare Automation and Technology (SWAT) Team, the White House’s first and only agile development team, and as a New Media Fellow, in the Federal Communications Commission’s Office of the Managing Director. His paper, Towards a More Agile Government was published in the Public Contract Law Journal, arguing that Federal IT Procurement should be more amenable to modern, agile development methods. More about the author →

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